Posts Tagged: research

Great oral examation for his PhD – Congratulations, Linh Duong!

A couple of weeks ago, one of my students completed his oral examination, where he did a great job defending his research and work that he completed as part of his PhD. Congratulations – Linh Duong!

Linh has worked hard over several years on his project, entitled: A Multi-criteria Continuous Review Inventory Management System for Perishable & Substitutable Products.

This research is particularly interesting for those folk that manage perishable goods, whether these goods are foodstuffs or pharmaceuticals. A key element of the work was the inclusion of substitutability — a really important concept in contemporary business practice, where consumers are happy or willing to buy a substitute product if their preferred product is not in stock. The practical impact, from the perspective of those managing replenishment, is that ‘normal’ consumption of a product can be boosted if there is additional consumption driven by the substitution effect.

We had an enjoyable examination process. As usual, the Postgraduate Centre staff did a fantastic job setting everything up and ensuring that the process was seamless. The convenor walked us through the process earlier and did a great job during the examination itself. The oral examiners asked a range of interesting questions on a range of factors and issues in the thesis. Linh did a great job of addressing the questions and adding additional insight into the examiners’ understanding of the research.

Thank you, Linh, it was great working with you on the project and I’m sad to see this come to a close. Thanks also to Associate Professor William YC Wang, Linh’s other supervisor, who provided valuable support and assistance during the project.

Last week, another of our AUT PhD students also had a successful oral examination – congratulations to Freddie Mbuba! Congratulations also to his supervisors, Associate Professor William YC Wang and Dr Karin Olesen.

The nexus between research and teaching

We hear plenty about research-informed teaching from Deans and accreditation bodies. To some faculty it all seems meaningless, hot-air-fuelled nonsense. Is it?

In their publication “Faculty Research Productivity and Standardized Student Learning Outcomes in a University Teaching Environment”, Galbraith and Merrill note that “…it was found that faculty research activity is positively and significantly related to teaching effectiveness …”

While many research studies focus on the evaluation of student evaluations as a measure of teaching effectiveness, Galbraith and Merrill took care to measure learning outcomes using standardised student learning outcome measure in a more robust and defensible way.

If you look around, while there are strong drivers to promote faculty to be more research active, in Australasia many faculty still don’t get fully engaged in research. Those that are tend to be extremely self-motivated folk. The same self-motivation may also manifest itself as a keen and careful teacher, generating the improved learning outcomes in the study.

Regardless, an interesting finding that does validate the belief that those engaged in research have a lot of interesting things to say about their subject and possess plenty of passion to inspire their students…

Research: See the whole supply chain and mark efficiently

How did YOU learn about the complex, interconnected nature of decisions made in supply chains? We often don’t see the impact of a decision we make – the repercussions may be felt months later by some poor worker on the other side of the world. Stuck with the same problem, we’ve been working on improving our presentation and visualisation of supply chains to students. Our research team has, in the past, constructed several simulated components that we hope to be able to combine, with further information overlaid, in a series of structured lessons. In a nutshell – shrinking a supply chain down into a still relatively-realistically represented, simulated, supply chain. And then there’s no end to the ways that you could use this in university or vocational training.
Universities are pushed to improve their efficiency and effectiveness of operations (at least, we have been told so; our experience with burgeoning administration and bureaucracy makes us wonder about this!). Doing our bit – we’ve been working on evaluating different marking and feedback support systems. Hypothesis – using cool technology will help us to do the same job, faster! Well, that’s what we thought, that’s what I perceived during the project, but … what is the data showing us? I have a conference paper with the first set of data will be submitted tomorrow; other data that will help us evaluate is still being collected. (Thanks to Ashley for her help administering the survey.) In any case – this is why we do research, ’cause things aren’t always as they seem …. 🙂